Welcome To


WesternIndia

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Welcome to
Western India

Western India comprises three large states, one small state and two minuscule union territories. It is bounded by Pakistan and the Arabian sea to its west and the Gangetic plains to its east. This is the most heterogeneous of India's regions. The states differ drastically from one another in language, culture and levels of economic development. Maharashtra and Gujarat are among the most industrialized states of India while Rajasthan and Goa are magnets for tourists, though for different reasons.

Hotels of
Western India

Maharashtra

Maharashtra, a state spanning west-central India, is best known for its fast-paced capital, Mumbai (formerly Bombay). This sprawling metropolis is the seat of the Bollywood film industry. It’s also famed for sites like the British Raj-era Gateway of India monument and the cave temples at nearby Elephanta Island.



Goa

Goa is a state in western India with coastlines stretching along the Arabian Sea. Its long history as a Portuguese colony prior to 1961 is evident in its preserved 16th-century churches and the area’s tropical spice plantations. Goa is also known for its beaches, ranging from popular stretches at Baga and Palolem to laid-back fishing villages such as Agonda

Rajasthan

Rajasthan is a northern Indian state bordering Pakistan. Its palaces and forts are reminders of the many kingdoms that historically vied for the region. In its capital, Jaipur, are the 18th-century City Palace and Hawa Mahal, a former cloister for royal women, fronted by a 5-story sandstone screen. Amer Fort, atop a nearby hill, was built by a Rajput prince in the 1600s.



Gujrat

Gujarat, India's westernmost state, has varied terrain and numerous sacred sites. In its urban center of Ahmedabad is the Calico Museum of Textiles, displaying antique and modern Indian fabrics. Spiritual leader Mahatma Gandhi's  base from 1917-1930 was Sabarmati Ashram, where his living quarters remain on view.